Exclusive Interview with Langhorne Slim on New Music and Frye Company

Congrats on the new album! You have been releasing music for over 10 years, and that’s a lot to choose from when making your set list for a show. How do you choose which songs you’re going to play for a particular venue? Does it vary? Do you pull from one album more than another?

In the 15 years that we have been a band, with the exception of maybe one or two nights, have we ever had a set list. We pull from what we are inspired to play that night. Obviously there are songs that we play each and every night. The songs that arise to the top over the course of time that still feel fresh and new to me and hopefully my band mates, are the ones we play. Then when we have a new record we obviously play the new stuff. But I never hold songs back if I write them and are excited about them. I just want to feel raw and in the moment.

How does Lost at Last, Vol. 1 reflect where you are in your life?

The truthful answer is that I put out a full band record about two years ago. I love my band with all my heart. After we made that record, I went home and I felt like there was still something within me that I did not get out. I wanted to make something very raw. My dream was to invite my friends to my living room, have a recording device, teach them the songs that day, and press record then have it be a record. I went through a little bit of a struggle, if I am being completely honest, where I was attaching my identity to how well certain things were doing and where I was in my career. I realized that was a very unhealthy place for me to be. I just wanted to do something that makes me feel good. Weather it be silly, heart breaking, or optimistic just to let it rip. Whatever was coming through me, I tried not to stop it with my ego mind and just to feel it.

How long have you wanted to do an album like this?

It is kind of the album’s I have been doing, but not as following my own lead as much. I have been fortunate to have this amazing band for years and years and it’s a very collaborative experience. For me it has provided a family and beautiful music. I wanted this to be not road tested material. Just get in a room for a few days, rehearse the songs, and go record them, which is what we did.

Were you concerned about creating an album that was so different from your previous?

No that was the whole point.

Where does the album art aesthetic come from?

There is my favorite record store in the entire world, Mississippi Records, in Portland Oregon. I am on their subscription list, where they send you these incredible compilations from all different genres. Music that I have never heard in my life that are instantly my favorite songs. This gentleman Eric, who runs it, makes all the artwork and I am a huge fan of what he did, so I reached out to him. I thought this record fit his aesthetic and he certainly fits my aesthetic. So he graced me with making the record art.

Now that the album is out, what can we expect on the back of it? Writing for the next album?

I am waiting for this to go big and retirement. hahaha The idea is to make something, that is why we put out the three EP’s. I want to continue making music. I am going to tour a lot starting in February.


Why do you think you and Frye make a good team?

We became friends at Pilgrimage Festival in Franklin, TN. One of my best friends and favorite songwriters is a guy name Jonny Fritz and he does beautiful leather work and works with frye. So we met there and hit it off and I got some boots and here we are.

Do you have a favorite Frye shoe or boot?

There are my favorite today.


This FRYEDAYS event is an intimate gathering — on tour you’re playing some big festivals — what do you like about those different settings?

It is very different and very much the same as to what I try to put out. I do not cater to one or the other. I honestly try to just let the music flow through me. It’s not like I am going to do this if there are more people or that if there are less people. Sometimes it is scarier to play in front of 50 people than it is to play in front of 5,000 people. I just try to let it rip regardless.

Being a Nashvillian, what are some of your favorite dishes and where are the best places to find them?

I feel like I am still a tourist here, I have only been here five years. I am a vegetarian that lives in Tennessee. I have been meatless since I was 11. There is a restaurant really close to where I live on the east side called Two Ten Jack that I love and there is the Wild Cow. There is this amazing place called High Garden Tea Shop that serves all kind of teas and elixirs.

One food you sneak a little extra of when no one is looking?

I don’t sneak food when no one’s looking. I will tear a cupcake and candy up, but I don’t care who see’s.

The holidays are almost here, name three things you are thankful for this year.

I am thankful for Casey Jane, Bodie and an amazing team to help put this record out, and in a time of so much darkness and fear in life, I am thankful to be able to hopefully put a little bit of light and love and positivity into the world.

Finally, If you could eat or have a drink with one person dead or alive, who would it be and what would you have?

If I could have a meal with both of my grandfathers again, I would choose that.


Website: http://www.langhorneslim.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/langhorneslim/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/langhorneslim/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/langhorneslim

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